University Policies (relevant to teaching)

See the Senate Policy File for information on all University policies.

Course Policies - Absences

From the Senate Policy File (University Policies: Academics): Absence from Class, Student 1.0 Absence from First Class Meeting: If a student who is enrolled in a course does not attend the first class meeting of the semester or session and is not present at the start of the second meeting, the instructor may officially delete (drop) the student from the course roster, of which deletion the student shall immediately be notified. 2.0 Absence for Official University Events and Activities: Official university events and activities such as inter collegiate athletics, fine arts performances, forensics, and other academic competitions supported by the university require participation by students as official members of groups. Responsibilities shall be as follows:

2.1 Sponsoring Departments or Programs: A sponsor of an official university event or activity shall provide each student participant with a memorandum regarding specific absences from classes. The memorandum shall be given to the student’s instructors within the first two weeks of classes. If scheduling changes occur, the sponsor shall provide the student with a revised memorandum to be given to instructors. 2.2 Student Participants: Within the first two weeks of classes, a student who expects to be part of an official university event or activity shall notify the instructors of affected courses. At that time, the student shall request accommodation for any missed examinations or other assignments. If scheduling changes occur, the student shall immediately notify the instructors. 2.3 Instructors: When possible, the instructor shall reasonably accommodate the student’s required absence from class. An instructor who believes that the anticipated absences would preclude successful completion of the course or would seriously affect the student’s grade shall inform the student by the end of the second week of classes.

3.0 Absence for Religious Observances

3.1 By the end of the second week of classes, students should notify the instructors of affected courses of planned absences for religious observances. 3.2 Instructors shall reasonably accommodate students who notify them in advance of planned absences for religious observances.

Cheating and Plagiarism

From the Senate Policy File (University Policies: Academics): Cheating and Plagiarism

1.0 Institutions of higher education are founded to impart knowledge, seek truth, and encourage one’s development for the good of society. University students shall thus be intellectually and morally obliged to pursue their course of studies with honesty and integrity. Therefore, in preparing and submitting materials for academic courses and in taking examinations, a student shall not yield to cheating or plagiarism, which not only violate academic standards but also make the offender liable to penalties explicit in Title 5 of the
California Code of Regulations, part 5, sec. 41301(a), as follows:
41301. Expulsion, Suspension and Probation of Students. Following procedures consonant with due process established pursuant to Section 41304, any student of a campus may be expelled, suspended, placed on probation or given a lesser sanction for one or more of the following causes that must be campus related:
(a) Cheating or plagiarism in connection with an academic program at a campus. A student who has committed either offense may be subject to university disciplinary action.

2.0 Definitions
2.1 Cheating shall be defined as the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain credit for academic work by the use of dishonest, deceptive, or fraudulent means. Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to (a) copying, in part or in whole, from another’s test or other examination; (b) discussing answers or ideas relating to the answers on a test or other examination without the permission of the instructor; (c) obtaining copies of a test, an examination, or other course material without the permission of the instructor; (d) using notes, cheat sheets, or other devices considered inappropriate under the prescribed testing condition; (e) collaborating with another or others in work to be presented without the permission of the instructor; (f) falsifying records, laboratory
work, or other course data; (g) submitting work previously presented in another course, if contrary to the rules of the course; (h) altering or interfering with the grading procedures; (i) plagiarizing, as defined; and (j) knowingly and intentionally assisting another student in any of the above.
2.2 Plagiarism shall be defined as the act of incorporating ideas, words, or specific substance of another, whether purchased, borrowed, or otherwise obtained, and submitting same to the university as one’s own work to fulfill academic requirements without giving credit to the appropriate source. Plagiarism shall include but not be limited to (a) submitting work, either in part or in whole, completed by another; (b) omitting footnotes for ideas, statements, facts, or conclusions that belong to another; (c) omitting quotation marks when quoting directly from another, whether it be a paragraph, sentence, or part thereof; (d) close and lengthy paraphrasing of
the writings of another; (e) submitting another person’s artistic works, such as musical compositions, photographs, paintings, drawings, or sculptures; and (f) submitting as one’s own work papers purchased from research companies.

3.0 Academic and Punitive Sanctions: Cheating and plagiarism in connection with the academic program at the university may warrant two separate and distinct courses of disciplinary action that may be applied concurrently in response to a violation of this policy: (a) academic sanctions, such as grade modifications; and (b) punitive sanctions, such as probation, suspension, or expulsion. Academic sanctions are concerned with the student’s grades and are the responsibility of the instructor involved. Punitive sanctions are
concerned with the student’s records and status on campus and shall be the responsibility of the university President or designated representative. The Coordinator of Judiciary Procedures shall be the President’s representative in matters of student discipline.

4.0 Due Process in Review of Alleged Violations
4.1 Punitive Sanctions: Only the university President or designated representative shall be authorized to exercise punitive authority over students and in so doing shall be mandated to accord students all the elements of “due process.” The steps set forth in CSU Executive Order 970, “Student Conduct Procedures of The California State University,” shall be followed in the delineation of
these matters.

4.2 Academic Sanctions
4.21 The instructor involved shall be expected to determine the type of academic sanction for cheating or plagiarism. Usually, “grade modification” shall be used; however, grade modification shall not be considered punishment and shall be used only if the instructor is
satisfied that cheating or plagiarism did occur. The grade modification shall be left to the discretion of the instructor. Grade modification may include (a) a zero or F on the paper, project, or examination, (b) a reduction in one letter grade (e.g., C to D in the course), or
(c) an F in the course. In addition to grade modification, certain departments or schools may have policies that state that cheating can show unsuitability for the program or profession. Students should be made aware of the penalties for cheating and of their
appeal rights.
4.22 Furthermore, before applying grade modification, the instructor should advise the student of the alleged violation and should have reasonable evidence to sustain that allegation. Reasonable evidence, such as documentary evidence or personal observation or both,
shall be necessary for the allegation to be upheld.
4.3 When a student is accused of cheating or plagiarism, the instructor should arrange an informal office conference with the student and at that time advise the student of the allegation as well as the evidence supporting it. The purpose of the office conference shall be to bring together the persons involved to discuss the situation informally and to decide upon an appropriate solution. If more than one student is involved in the incident, the instructor may call the students together to confer as a group if the students so desire. All notes and discussions between the student and instructor shall be confidential, except as may be relevant in subsequent campus disciplinary proceedings or subsequent legal action.

5.0 Disciplinary Record: In order to coordinate information so as to permit appropriate disciplinary action for first-time and repeat offenders, instructors shall contact the Center for Student Rights and Responsibilities (http://csrr.sdsu.edu/) to obtain reporting requirements. Instructors should describe violations of this policy according to the requirements stated in EO 969 (http://www.calstate.edu/eo/EO-969.html).

Course Policies - Exams

From the Senate Policy File (University Policies: Academics): Examinations and Projects 1.0 Final Examinations and Projects

1.1 Because of many valid methods of instruction, not all courses may require the standard, comprehensive final examination. When, however, an instructor does conclude a course with a major, comprehensive final examination, that examination shall be given at the place and time scheduled during the final examination week. Other tests such as an hour exam or quiz may be given during the final week of classes. No examinations shall be given on “study and consultation” days. 1.2 Although university policy does not demand the administration of a final, comprehensive examination on the day, time, and place specified in the Class Schedule, the days designated for Final Examinations shall be counted among the academic workdays constituting the legally defined semester or session. Every instructor, therefore, shall conduct some class business with students on the day and at the time officially scheduled for the final examination for each course. The instructor may use the scheduled final examination period to review examinations or projects with the class. 1.3 Should an instructor determine that final course assignments can be called neither “major, comprehensive final examinations” nor “hour exams” nor even “projects,” the instructor shall exercise professional expertise and responsibility, common sense, and good will to translate the letter and spirit of this policy.

2.0 Examinations for Disabled Students: Instructors shall give students with certified disabilities time and opportunity to complete examinations without undue disadvantage. 3.0 Saturday Examinations

3.1 By the end of the third week of classes, students shall notify instructors of conflict with Saturday examinations for religious observance. 3.2 Instructors shall reasonably accommodate students who notify them of conflict with Saturday examinations for religious observance.

4.0 Group Examinations

4.1 No department or school shall be assured of more than a single examination period in which to hold common examinations for multiple section courses. 4.2 Group examination periods shall be allotted in available spaces according to number of students. 4.3 Requests for special time periods shall be granted only if received in the Office of the Provost in time for announcement in the Class Schedule. 4.4 Group midterm examinations requiring the use of hours outside the regular class schedule shall be permitted for multiple section courses that require a common midterm examination. Specific regulations are as follows:

4.41 The dates and times of group midterm examinations shall be announced in the Class Schedule. 4.42 Regularly scheduled class meetings should be reduced to compensate for the time used to test in-group midterm examinations.

General Education framework

From the catalog and Curriculum Guide: General Education profoundly influences undergraduates by providing the breadth of knowledge necessary for meaningful work, life-long learning, socially responsible citizenship, and intellectual development. This 49-unit program, which comprises over one third of an undergraduate’s course of study, places specialized disciplines into a wider world, enabling students to integrate knowledge and to make connections among fields of inquiry. The General Education program at SDSU prepares students to succeed in an increasingly complex and rapidly changing world. Our students will live and work in the context of globalization, scientific and technological innovation, cross-cultural encounters, environmental challenges, and unforeseen shifts in economic and political power. Through this program, students will acquire knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world that will enable them to engage significant questions, both contemporary and enduring. To put their breadth of knowledge to work, students gain intellectual and practical skills such as inquiry and analysis, creative and critical thinking, written and oral communication, scientific and quantitative literacy, and technological-information proficiencies. Students practice these skills in progressively challenging venues, mastering learning outcomes from a series of courses drawn from the following four sections: I) Communication and Critical Thinking; II) Foundations of Learning; III) American Institutions; and IV) Explorations of Human Experience. In order to acquire the skills required for advanced coursework within and across disciplines, students should complete the four sections sequentially. The General Education program at San Diego State University is evolving. A standing committee of faculty and students reviews the program continually and encourages the development of new courses, concepts, and learning experiences.

The Seven Essential Capacities Developed through the GE Program

 In addition to mastering the specialized disciplinary knowledge typically associated with undergraduate majors, well-educated individuals acquire general abilities, habits of mind, or capacities that significantly enhance their intellectual and professional lives. Students come to understand how arguments – whether in journal articles, laboratory reports, lyrics, or manifestos – are constructed and evaluated; and they are able to craft persuasive cases in a wide variety of contexts. Students become familiar with the ways scholars – whether physicists or literary critics – theorize; and they are able to apply different kinds of theoretical models to real-world conditions. Students come to realize that most significant phenomena – from endangered species to British novels – cannot be understood in isolation because they are inevitably situated in complex webs or networks of interrelated phenomena; and they are able to locate concepts, ideas, texts, and events within these broader contexts. Students recognize the value of engaging diverse and opposing principles, perspectives, and people to achieve political, intellectual, artistic, and social ends; and they grow competent in the sorts of negotiations such engagement requires. Students come to appreciate that local and global perspectives on subjects as diverse as policing, safe drinking water, and artistic trends are inevitably connected; and they can bring the two perspectives together. Students come to see that diverse concepts – from principles of harmony to supply and demand – apply to multiple phenomena; and they are skilled in identifying the relevance of such concepts across traditional boundaries. Finally, students come to understand the intricate causal relationships between actions – whether giving a dowry or exploring space – and their effects; and they develop the ability to evaluate consequences in meaningful and responsible ways. In order to develop these abilities in all our students, San Diego State University’s General Education program will emphasize the following seven essential capacities:

  1. Construct, analyze, and communicate arguments;
  2. Apply theoretical models to the real world;
  3. Contextualize phenomena;
  4. Negotiate differences;
  5. Integrate global and local perspectives;
  6. Illustrate relevance of concepts across boundaries;
  7. Evaluate consequences of actions.

It is important to note that although these essential capacities inform General Education, they are by no means its exclusive property. In fact, these fundamental abilities are to be further strengthened through students’ major coursework. More specific goals of the various areas of General Education articulate directly with the seven essential capacities, in many cases manifesting the general abilities characterized – in rather abstract terms – by the capacities.

Communication and Critical Thinking: A Core Lower-Division Component of the GE Program

 Communication and Critical Thinking are essential skills that underlie all university education. Focusing particularly on argument, courses in this area of General Education help students understand the general function of writing, speaking, visual texts, and thinking within the context of the university at large, rather than within specific disciplines. In addition to featuring the basic rules and conventions governing composition and presentation, Communication and Critical Thinking courses establish intellectual frameworks and analytical tools that help students explore, construct, critique, and integrate sophisticated texts.

Goal 1: Craft well-reasoned arguments for specific audiences.

Goal 2: Analyze a variety of texts commonly encountered in the academic setting.

Goal 3: Situate discourse within social, generic, cultural, and historic contexts.

Goal 4: Assess the relative strengths of arguments and supporting evidence. 

The Three Areas of the GE Program

 Area A. Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning

 Natural Sciences – Natural Sciences use the scientific process to study nature and represent an approach to the study of the universe and its natural laws and phenomena. Students achieve basic scientific literacy and thereby understand the scientific process including the value of observation, hypothesis testing, and experiments in the advance of science. Thus students require a general understanding of fundamental concepts and knowledge accumulated by the natural sciences. From that understanding, students develop an ability to reason about and follow new developments in the natural sciences, and to think in a scientifically informed manner about social and political issues that involve science and technology.

Goal 1: Explain basic concepts and theories of the natural sciences.

Goal 2: Use logic and scientific methods to analyze the natural world and solve problems.

Goal 3: Argue from multiple perspectives about issues in natural science that have personal and global relevance.

Goal 4: Use technology in laboratory and field situations to connect concepts and theories with real-world phenomena. 

Quantitative reasoning– Quantitative reasoning refers to a range of academic capacities that includes learning from data, communicating quantitatively, analyzing evidence and assertions, and employing quantitative intuition. While quantitative reasoning is essential to sciences, other disciplines require the ability to use and comprehend quantitative language. To do this, students require the ability to analyze and interpret data in both scientific and social contexts. By possessing this set of mathematical and problem solving skills, students will be able to engage effectively in quantitative situations arising in life and work.

Goal 1: Apply appropriate computational skills and use basic mathematical concepts to analyze problems in natural and social sciences.

Goal 2: Use methods of quantitative reasoning to solve and communicate answers to real-world problems.

Area B. Social and Behavioral Sciences

 The Social and Behavioral Sciences focus on human behavior, cognition, and organization from anthropological, economic, geographic, linguistic, political, psychological and sociological perspectives. Students gain an understanding of society and culture, as well as individual and social interaction processes. Disciplines within the Social and Behavioral Sciences employ the scientific method and utilize both quantitative and qualitative techniques to analyze the diversity and complexity of human experience. Through interdisciplinary learning, students explore the relationships between human societies and the physical environment.

Goal 1: Explore and recognize basic terms, concepts, and domains of the social and behavioral sciences.

Goal 2: Comprehend diverse theories and methods of the social and behavioral sciences.

Goal 3: Identify human behavioral patterns across space and time and discuss their interrelatedness and distinctiveness.

Goal 4: Enhance understanding of the social world through the application of conceptual frameworks from the social and behavioral sciences to first-hand engagement with contemporary issues.

 Area C. Humanities and Fine Arts

The Humanities and Fine Arts encompass works of the imagination, such as art, literature, film, drama, dance, and music, and related scholarship. Students better understand human problems, responsibilities, and possibilities in changing historical contexts and diverse cultures, and in relation to the natural environment. Students acquire new languages and familiarize themselves with related cultures. They gain the ability to recognize and assess various aesthetic principles, belief systems, and constructions of identity. Students acquire capacities for reflection, critique, communication, cultural understanding, creativity, and problem solving in an increasingly globalized world.

Goal 1: Analyze written, visual, or performed texts in the humanities and fine arts with sensitivity to their diverse cultural contexts and historical moments.

Goal 2: Develop a familiarity with various aesthetic and other value systems and the ways they are communicated across time and cultures.

Goal 3: Argue from multiple perspectives about issues in the humanities that have personal and global relevance.

Goal 4: Demonstrate the ability to approach complex problems and ask complex questions drawing upon knowledge of the humanities.

The Two Course Levels within the GE Program

 Lower-Division Foundations of Learning (100- and 200-level)

 Foundations of Learning courses follow and build upon Communication and Critical Thinking courses and are offered by individual departments and interdisciplinary areas in the Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning, Social and Behavioral Sciences, and Humanities and Fine Arts. Foundations of Learning courses in the Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning are divided into four categories: 1. Physical Sciences, 2. Life Sciences, 3. Laboratory, and 4. Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning. Foundations of Learning courses in in the Humanities and Fine Arts are divided into five categories: 1. Literature, 2. Art, Classics, Dance, Drama, Humanities, and Music, 3. History, 4. Philosophy and Religious Studies, and 5. Foreign Language. Foundations of Learning courses introduce students to the basic concepts, theories, and approaches offered by disciplinary and interdisciplinary areas of study. They provide the foundation to understand and approach problems in the academy, and in local and global real-world environments. Consistent with class size and learning goals, they cultivate skills in reading, writing, communication, computation, information-gathering, and use of technology. Where appropriate, courses intended as preparation for a major may also be designated as Foundations courses. Only lower division courses are designated as Foundations of Learning courses.

Upper-Division Explorations of Human Experience (300- and 400-level)

Explorations of Human Experience courses are upper division courses which allow concentrated or thematic study. In Explorations of Human Experience there are three areas of study – Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning, Social and Behavioral Sciences, and Humanities and Fine Arts. Among these areas are courses designated as cultural diversity courses. “Explorations of Human Experience” courses take the goals and skills of “Foundations of Learning” courses to a more advanced level. This may find expression in one or more of the following pedagogical elements: greater interdisciplinary, more complex and in-depth theory, deeper investigation of local problems, and wider awareness of global challenges. More extensive reading, written analysis involving complex comparisons well-developed arguments, considerable bibliography, and use of technology are appropriate in many explorations courses. Courses narrowly centered within one aspect of a discipline are more suited to major study than general education, which encourages students to relate their learning across the range of their educational experience. Explorations of Human Experience courses are upper division and cannot be used to fulfill this requirement if taken before students reach junior standing (passing 60 units).   While new faculty will become more familiar with these General Education and broader graduation requirements over time, you are encouraged to direct students to the Academic Advising Center (http://arweb.sdsu.edu/es/advising/contact.html) for general degree advising and to their major adviser for disciplinary advising (i.e., major requirements, etc.).

General Education syllabus statements

SDSU policy requires that GE course syllabi include the appropriate GE sub-area statements. These statements are provided below; please be sure to select the correct one for your course! Instructors are also strongly encouraged to explicitly link the GE Essential Capacities and Area Goals to their course-specific SLOs within their syllabus and to discuss these relationships in their course.

Foundations of Learning in Communication and Critical Thinking

This (Oral Composition/Composition/Intermediate Composition and Critical Thinking) course is a one of three Communication and Critical Thinking courses in your General Education (GE) program-of-study. Upon completion of these courses, you should be able to demonstrate the following GE Communication and Critical Thinking Student Learning Outcomes as well as the course-specific Student Learning Outcomes:

1) craft well-reasoned arguments for specific audiences;

2) analyze a variety of texts commonly encountered in the academic setting;

3) situate discourse within social, generic, cultural, and historic contexts;

4) assess the relative strengths of arguments and supporting evidence.

Foundations of Learning in Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning

This course is one of nine lower-division Foundations of Learning courses in your General Education (GE) program-of-study. Foundations of Learning courses cultivate skills in reading, writing, research, communication, computation, information literacy, and use of technology. They furthermore introduce you to basic concepts, theories and approaches in a variety of disciplines in order to provide the intellectual breadth necessary to help you integrate the more specialized knowledge gained from your major area of study into a broader world picture. More specifically, this (Physical Science/Life Science/Laboratory/Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning) course is one of four Foundations of Learning courses that you will complete in GE Area A Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning. Upon completion of these courses, you should be able to demonstrate the following GE Area A Student Learning Outcomes as well as the course-specific Student Learning Outcomes:

1) explain basic concepts and theories of the natural sciences;

2) use logic and scientific methods to analyze the natural world and solve problems;

3) argue from multiple perspectives about issues in natural science that have personal and global relevance;

4) use technology in laboratory and field situations to connect concepts and theories with real-world phenomena.

5) apply appropriate computational skills and use basic mathematical concepts to analyze problems in natural and social sciences;

6) use methods of quantitative reasoning to solve and communicate answers to real-world problems.

 Foundations of Learning in Social and Behavioral Sciences

This course is one of nine lower-division Foundations of Learning courses in your General Education (GE) program-of-study. Foundations of Learning courses cultivate skills in reading, writing, research, communication, computation, information literacy, and use of technology. They furthermore introduce you to basic concepts, theories and approaches in a variety of disciplines in order to provide the intellectual breadth necessary to help you integrate the more specialized knowledge gained from your major area of study into a broader world picture. More specifically, this course is one of two Foundations of Learning courses that you will complete in Area B Social and Behavioral Sciences. Upon completion of these courses, you should be able to demonstrate the following GE Area B Student Learning Outcomes as well as the course-specific Student Learning Outcomes:

1) explore and recognize basic terms, concepts, and domains of the social and behavioral sciences;

2) comprehend diverse theories and methods of the social and behavioral sciences;

3) identify human behavioral patterns across space and time and discuss their interrelatedness and distinctiveness;

4) enhance your understanding of the social world through the application of conceptual frameworks from the social and behavioral sciences to first-hand engagement with contemporary issues.

Foundations of Learning in Humanities and Fine Arts

This course is one of nine lower-division Foundations of Learning courses in your General Education (GE) program-of-study. Foundations of Learning courses cultivate skills in reading, writing, research, communication, computation, information literacy, and use of technology. They furthermore introduce you to basic concepts, theories and approaches in a variety of disciplines in order to provide the intellectual breadth necessary to help you integrate the more specialized knowledge gained from your major area of study into a broader world picture. More specifically, this (Literature/Arts, Classics, Dance, Drama, Humanities, and Music/History/Philosophy and Religious Studies/Foreign Language) course is one of four Foundations courses that you will complete in GE Area C Humanities and Fine Arts. Upon completion of these courses, you should be able to demonstrate the following GE Area C Student Learning Outcomes as well at the course-specific Student Learning Outcomes:

1) analyze written, visual, or performed texts in the humanities and fine arts with sensitivity to their diverse cultural contexts and historical moments;

2) describe various aesthetic and other value systems and the ways they are communicated across time and cultures;

3) identify issues in the humanities that have personal and global relevance;

4) demonstrate the ability to approach complex problems and ask complex questions drawing upon knowledge of the humanities.

 Explorations of Human Experience in Natural Sciences

This course is one of three upper-division Explorations of Human Experience courses in your General Education (GE) program-of-study. These courses collectively build upon the goals and skills of your lower-division GE Foundations of Learning courses through greater interdisciplinary, more complex and in-depth theory, deeper investigation of local problems, and wider awareness of global challenges. Thus, these upper-division courses typically require more extensive reading, written analysis involving complex comparisons, well-developed arguments, bibliographic work, and use of technology for learning. More specifically, completion of this course will help fulfill the Natural Sciences component of the Explorations of Human Experience in your GE program-of-study. Upon completion of this course, you should be able to demonstrate the following GE Area A Student Learning Outcomes as well as the course-specific Student Learning Outcomes:

1) explain basic concepts and theories of the natural sciences;

2) use logic and scientific methods to analyze the natural world and solve problems;

3) argue from multiple perspectives about issues in natural science that have personal and global relevance;

4) use technology in laboratory and field situations to connect concepts and theories with real-world phenomena.

Explorations of Human Experience in Social and Behavioral Sciences

This course is one of three upper-division Explorations of Human Experience courses in your General Education (GE) program-of-study. These courses collectively build upon the goals and skills of your lower-division GE Foundations of Learning courses through greater interdisciplinary, more complex and in-depth theory, deeper investigation of local problems, and wider awareness of global challenges. Thus, these upper-division courses typically require more extensive reading, written analysis involving complex comparisons, well-developed arguments, bibliographic work, and use of technology for learning. More specifically, completion of this course will fulfill the Social and Behavioral component of the Explorations of Human Experience requirement in your GE program-of-study. Upon completion of this course, you should be able to demonstrate the following GE Area B Student Learning Outcomes as well as the course-specific Student Learning Outcomes:

1) explore and recognize basic terms, concepts, and domains of the social and behavioral sciences;

2) comprehend diverse theories and methods of the social and behavioral sciences;

3) Identify human behavioral patterns across space and time and discuss their interrelatedness and distinctiveness;

4) enhance your understanding of the social world through the application of conceptual frameworks from the social and behavioral sciences to first-hand engagement with contemporary issues.

 Explorations of Human Experience in Humanities and Fine Arts

This course is one of three upper-division Explorations of Human Experience courses in your General Education (GE) program-of-study. These courses collectively build upon the goals and skills of your lower-division GE Foundations of Learning courses through greater interdisciplinary, more complex and in-depth theory, deeper investigation of local problems, and wider awareness of global challenges. Thus, these upper-division courses typically require more extensive reading, written analysis involving complex comparisons, well-developed arguments, bibliographic work, and use of technology for learning. More specifically, completion of this course will help fulfill the Humanities and Fine Arts component of the Explorations of Human Experience requirement in your GE program-of-study. Upon completion of this course, you should be able to demonstrate the following GE Area B Student Learning Outcomes as well as the course-specific Student Learning Outcomes:

1) analyze written, visual, or performed texts in the humanities and fine arts with sensitivity to their diverse cultural contexts and historical moments;

2) describe various aesthetic and other value systems and the ways they are communicated across time and cultures;

3) identify issues in the humanities that have personal and global relevance;

4) demonstrate the ability to approach complex problems and ask complex questions drawing upon knowledge of the humanities.

Grades
See pages 48-53 of the Policy File.
Hybrid, Online and Intercampus Courses

From the Senate Policy File (University Policies: Academics): Hybrid, Online and Intercampus Classes: Definitions and Scheduling 1.0 Hybrid, online, and intercampus classes involve a formal educational process in which student and instructor are not necessarily in the same physical location, but interact in a synchronous or asynchronous manner through technology. Classes in which 20% to 50% of the scheduled sessions are conducted through this process are defined as hybrid. Classes in which greater than 50% of the scheduled sessions are conducted through this process are defined as online. Classes in which the instructor is located on one SDSU campus and interacts with students on another SDSU campus shall be defined as intercampus; such intercampus classes shall be arranged through consultations between the instructor and the appropriate personnel on each campus. For all three class modes, any required synchronous interactions (e.g., weekly sessions, aperiodic examinations, capstone presentations) shall be clearly established in the official schedule of classes with respect to specific dates, days, times, and locations as appropriate. 2.0 The following guidelines shall apply to new hybrid and online classes.

2.1 The initial offering of a given course by a given instructor in hybrid and online modality shall be established through consultations between the instructor of record, the department chair, the college curriculum committee, and the associate dean of the college. An example “Initial Offering of Hybrid or Online Class” form to facilitate such consultations may be found in the Curriculum Guide. Each college shall establish and disseminate specific policies, expectations, and timelines for the submission and approval of such hybrid/online courses and instructors. Proposed hybrid/online course-instructors pairings that have not been previously approved through the college’s established process may be removed from the schedule of classes by the Dean’s office. 2.2 Hybrid online classes shall be so identified in the official schedule of classes, which shall notify students of any required participation in synchronous class activities beyond those session times indicated in the schedule of classes. 2.3 The schedule of classes shall notify students of any software and hardware required for participation in class meetings taking place when the student and instructor will not be in the same physical location. 2.4 Ownership of materials, faculty compensation, copyright issues and the use of revenue derived from the creation and production of hybrid and online classes, including software, or other media products shall be in accordance with the policy on Intellectual Property. 2.5 Regardless of the modality in which they are offered, classes should be consistent in terms of purpose, scope, quality, assessment and expected learning outcomes with other classes bearing the same department code, number, and course title. Courses shall meet all the standards set forth in the Curriculum Guide regardless of their modality. 2.6 Students enrolled in hybrid and online classes shall not be denied access to advisement, grievances, or other key academic rights and services, nor shall they be excused from the academic responsibilities expected of all students.

Retention of records

From the Senate Policy File (University Policies: Academics): Records 3.0 Records and Retention
3.1 Class Roster
3.11 The class roster contains the names of all students enrolled in each class.
3.12 The class roster shall be retained on the server for a minimum of seven years.
3.2 Grade and Attendance Records
3.21 Grade records shall contain notations related to a student’s progress in a class but may also reflect class attendance and office visits.
3.22 Records shall be retained by the instructor or the department or school for seven years after the conclusion of the class.
3.23 Instructors, upon leaving the employment of the university, shall surrender their recordsto the department chair or school director.
3.24 Graduate teaching assistants and temporary faculty shall turn in all class records to the department chair or school director at the end of each semester or session.
3.25 Instructors, upon leaving the employment of the university or upon taking leave from the University, shall surrender their incomplete grade contracts to the department chair or school director.

3.3 Examinations and Course Papers: Examination papers, reports, and other course papers may be retained by the instructor only if the instructor communicates to the student at the time of assigning such materials the instructor’s intention to retain them.
3.31 Instructors who retain examinations or graded work, hard copy or electronic, shall provide reasonable access to them.
3.32 Instructors shall dispose of examinations, reports, and other graded work no later than the day after the last day of the semester (excluding summer session) after the semester during which the student was enrolled provided that no grievance has been filed with the Student Grievance Committee.
3.33 Examinations, reports, and course papers shall be returned to the students in accord with each student’s right to confidentiality, which, however, shall not apply to dissertations orcomprehensive examinations at the master’s or doctoral level.

RTP

From the Senate Policy File (University Policies: Faculty): Reappointment, Tenure, and Promotion: Criteria (Excluding Library Faculty and Student Affairs Faculty) 1.0 The State of California Master Plan for Higher Education designates teaching as the California State University’s primary responsibility and recognizes research, scholarship, and creative activity and service as essential to meeting our responsibilities to our students and to the public interest. Accordingly, San Diego State University faculty shall be committed to excellence in teaching and shall conduct research, scholarship, and creative activity because of their intrinsic worth to society, because they may bring additional resources to the campus, and because they enhance and contribute to excellence in teaching. Active participation in service to the university, the profession, and the broader community as public scholars shall be integral to faculty duties because it ensures responsiveness to the needs of our students, to other constituents of the university, and to the public that is served. 2.0 Because the university provides access to underrepresented groups as well as traditional groups, the faculty shall be responsive to diverse student populations and needs through teaching, scholarship, research, and service. 3.0 Probationary and tenured faculty shall be evaluated on their achievements and contributions in (a) teaching, (b) research, scholarship, and creative activities, and (c) service activities to the university, the profession, and the community that enhance the mission of the university. In presenting one’s work to peer review committees, each candidate shall write a narrative summarizing and, when appropriate, integrating work in these three areas; and explaining how this work contributes to the candidate’s continuous development as a member of the faculty. Excellence in teaching shall not substitute for weakness in professional growth, nor shall excellence in professional growth substitute for weakness in teaching.

3.1 Teaching Effectiveness: The primary qualification for reappointment, tenure, or promotion shall be a demonstration of continuing excellence in teaching. Criteria for evaluating teaching effectiveness may include: command of the subject and currency in the field; skill in organizing and presenting material in ways that engage and motivate diverse student populations to participate in their own learning; ability to foster critical thinking; integration of professional growth into the curriculum; and innovative or creative pedagogies. Evidence for evaluating teaching effectiveness shall include student evaluations of instruction applied in appropriate teaching situations (e.g., classroom teaching, public lectures, seminars, studio, or laboratory teaching). Evidence also may include; peer reviews; creative course syllabi with clearly-stated learning outcomes; honors and distinctions received for excellence in teaching; textbooks; development of instructionally related materials; use of new technologies in teaching and learning; involving and mentoring students in research, scholarship, or creative activities; significant contributions to curriculum development; and contributions to student recruitment, advising, mentoring, and retention.

3.2 Professional Growth: A consistent pattern of continuous growth in research, scholarship, or creative activity that is relevant to the discipline or field of study shall be essential to the teaching effectiveness of faculty members, to the body knowledge of the profession, and to the mission and stature of the university. Criteria for evaluating professional growth shall include: significant and sustained contributions of high quality to the field; a well developed, coherent, and focused research plan or artistic vision; originality of thought and creativity; a demonstrated capacity for independent intellectual progress; and innovative contributions to the body of knowledge. Evidence for evaluating professional growth, as identified and defined in department or school and college guidelines, shall comprise: externally reviewed professional growth activities including, as a primary and necessary element, refereed publications of merit, or juried or curated exhibitions and performances. In appropriate disciplines, extramural grant funding may be required to support research, but grant funding is not in and of itself sufficient for tenure and/or promotion. Additional evidence of research, scholarship, and creative activity that supports the primary evidence noted in the paragraph above may include: presentation of scholarly papers; non-refereed or invited publications, exhibitions, and performances; translation and annotated editions; awards, grants, and honors received; journal or book editing; and leadership of and participation in seminars, workshops, institutes, and competitions. Quality of the evidence may be identified in several ways, appropriate to the various disciplines, and may include: published or unpublished reviews of a candidate’s work; external reviews; number of citations for a published work: journal impact factors; acceptance rates; stature of journal or book editorial boards; and/or reputation of journal or publisher in the field. The candidate shall delineate his or her role/contribution in all scholarly works.

3.3 Service to the university, the profession, and the community: Service is essential to the excellence of the university. Evidence of service may include appropriately documented activities that apply the faculty member’s professional expertise to the benefit of the university and community, such as: student outreach and retention; service to the department or school, college, and university; refereeing or judging for professional journals, grant agencies, and artistic panels; significant committee work; student mentoring; active participation in professional associations; offices in university-associated or relevant community organizations; appropriate governmental boards or commissions; educational lectures; advancement of public or private support for the university; and seminars for community groups. Appropriate service activities are expected for candidates at all levels but shall not replace the requirement for excellence in teaching and professional growth. In rare cases, however, when a tenured candidate distinguishes herself or himself in performing such duties to the significant benefit of the university and/or beyond, and when this performance is appropriately documented over a significant length of time, such service for the university shall have more than the usual bearing on promotion decisions.

4.0 Standards for promotion to the rank of Professor shall be demonstrated by a cumulative record of excellence in teaching, professional growth, and service beyond that which is required for promotion to Associate Professor. Candidates for promotion to Professor must demonstrate superior contributions to teaching effectiveness, such as devising innovative teaching tools, creating new curricula and/or assessment systems, serving on university or professional curriculum committees, and/or receiving recognition for teaching excellence. Candidates for promotion to Professor also shall provide evidence of a strong and coherent program of continuous professional growth that demonstrates their expertise in a particular field or area and impact of their work upon the body of knowledge. A higher level of service and participation in shared governance is expected and more weight shall be given to them for promotion to the rank of Professor. 5.0 Departments or schools and colleges shall provide guidelines specifying how university criteria shall be applied to and interpreted in disciplines within a department, school or college. These guidelines shall not contradict or be inconsistent with the university criteria. In the event of conflict between university criteria and any department, school or college guidelines, or procedures, the university criteria shall govern. 6.0 The entire professional record of the candidate shall be considered, including accomplishments prior to appointment at this university. Work developed or sustained while serving at this university shall be essential to the award of tenure and/or promotion. 7.0 Achievements shall be supported by evidence as specified above. Candidates may list all achievements in a curriculum vitae. Candidates shall present in their Personnel Data Summary (PDS) a limited listing and discussion of no more than five of their important achievements in each of the three categories.   Also see the Policy File and Faculty Affairs for additional information on RTP procedures.

Student conduct
The SDSU catalog has a section on University Policies that covers issues relevant to students; these include such topics as privacy rights, nondiscrimination statements, academic policies about things like repeating courses or academic probation, and student conduct. This information is provided to students during orientation and is printed in the catalog each year. Faculty and staff are strongly encouraged to review this material and familiarize themselves with this information provided to students.
Student Evaluations

The Help Guide for the Faculty Evaluation Form Builder (accessed through WebPortal) can be found here. The list of possible student information questions can be found here.

From the Senate Policy File (University Policies: Faculty) –

Personnel Files

5.0 Written Student Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness

5.1 All course sections taught by faculty employees shall be evaluated by students unless consultation with a college has resulted in an agreement by the dean of the college and the college peer review committee to evaluate fewer sections. In cases where student evaluations are not required for all course sections, sections chosen for evaluation shall be representative of the faculty unit employee’s teaching assignment, and shall be jointly determined in consultation between the faculty unit employee being evaluated and his/her department chair or program director. In the event of disagreement, each party shall select 50% of the course sections to be evaluated. The results of these evaluations shall be placed in the faculty unit employee’s Personnel Action File. Results of evaluations may be stored in electronic format and incorporated by extension into the Personnel Action File provided that individuals involved in evaluations and personnel recommendations or decisions are provided secure access for these purposes.

5.11 For the purpose of clarity and comparability across campus, responses to all quantitative items shall be rated from 1 to 5, with 1 the lowest (worst) and 5 the highest (best). These numbers shall correspond to the following descriptors, in the following order: 1=Poor, 2=Below Average, 3=Average, 4=Good, 5=Excellent. Responses of “not applicable” or “does not apply” shall be placed at the end.

5.12 Each form shall contain three common quantitative questions that together constitute universal reference points or common ground across the university’s faculty evaluation process. The following common quantitative questions shall be the first questions on each form:
• Rate the instructor’s overall organization and presentation of the course material.
• Rate the instructor’s focus on the student learning outcomes listed in the syllabus.
• Rate the instructor’s teaching overall.
In addition to these quantitative items, each form shall contain at least two open-ended, qualitative items prompting students to provide written comments. The common open-ended qualitative questions shall be:
• What were the instructor’s strengths?
• In what ways might the instructor improve this course?

5.13 Any additional evaluative items shall be limited in number—no more than ten additional quantitative items and no more than one additional qualitative item. Additional items shall emphasize criteria that are credibly evaluated by students (such as clarity of instruction, usefulness and timeliness of feedback on assignments and exams, perceived fairness, punctuality and reliability, ability to stimulate student interest, ability to communicate one’s subject matter or expertise, and problem-solving ability), rather than criteria that students are not particularly well qualified to judge (such as the instructor’s knowledge of the subject matter or teaching methodology).

5.14 If included on the form, demographic items (such as class standing, major, and so forth) and student self-evaluative items (such as hours spent on the class) shall be listed last and clearly distinguished from instructor evaluation items.

5.15 The evaluation results report shall contain a composite mean of the three common questions as well as an overall average of all quantitative items.

5.16 Student evaluations collected as part of the regular student evaluation process shall be anonymous and identified only by course or section.

5.17 Student communications or evaluations provided outside of the regular evaluation process shall be identified by name in order to be included in the Personnel Action File.

5.18 The results of student evaluation of instruction shall be an important element of the evaluation of instruction but not the sole indicator of instructional quality.

5.19 The results of student evaluations of teaching effectiveness for temporary faculty employees shall be included in their periodic evaluations as required.

5. 20 The results of student evaluations of teaching effectiveness for probationary and tenured faculty employees shall be part of the WPAF as required.

Syllabus Requirements

From the Senate Policy File (University Policies: Faculty) – also see Syllabus issues page for discussion of syllabus design and a syllabus checklist based on policies: Academic Responsibilities section: 1.0        Audiovisual Materials

1.1        Instructors shall ensure that audiovisual materials used in or for a course are significantly related to the announced structure and purpose of the course. An instructor shall advise the audience of materials that may be deemed offensive.

1.2        Audiovisual materials, whatever their source (rental, purchase, private collection, guest lecture), shall be legally acquired and shall include captioning whenever possible.

2.0        Course Syllabi: The syllabus for each course shall describe the course’s purpose, scope and student learning outcomes. In addition, each syllabus shall include office hours and contact information for the instructor, refer to the current procedure for accommodating students with disabilities (refer to Student Disability Services), and describe the course design, required materials, schedule, and grading policies, which may vary by section. A syllabus shall not bind the instructor to specific details, and the instructor shall retain the right to adjust the course design. Major departures from the syllabus, however, especially with regard to student learning outcomes, major assignment due dates and exam dates, and grading policies, shall be made only for compelling reasons.

2.1        Instructors shall provide students with access to their course syllabus at or before the first class meeting. In addition, instructors shall post their syllabus on the official and available course site of the SDSU BlackBoard learning management system as well as any other course web site routinely accessed by the course students. Any major changes to the course syllabus shall be announced in class, communicated to all students electronically, and incorporated into an updated and posted version of the syllabus.

2.2        Departments shall, by the end of the semester, upload their course syllabi in an accessible electronic format to the SDSU Syllabus Collection. Faculty may elect to complete and provide to their department a completed course information template (available from the SDSU Syllabus Collection) in lieu of the official course syllabus.

3.0        In order to facilitate universal access to instructional materials:

3.1        Instructors shall endeavor to order textbooks, course readers, and other required instructional materials on or before the deadline established by the campus bookstore, and definitely no later than six weeks in advance of the beginning of the academic term.

3.2        Whenever possible, departments and schools shall endeavor to order textbooks for classes without assigned instructors on or before the deadline established by the campus bookstore, and at least six weeks in advance of the beginning of the academic term.

4.0        Faculty Office Hours: Each faculty member shall hold regularly scheduled office hours and shall post a schedule of those hours and their contact information at their office location and within their syllabus.

Universal Access to Information Technology Resources and Services

From the Senate Policy File (University Policies: Academics):

Universal Access to Information Technology Resources and Services

1.0 San Diego State University is committed to providing an educational environment that assures comparable access to electronic and information technology for individuals with disabilities.

2.0 The University affirms that Academic Senate Resolution AS-2700-05/FA on Student Access to Academic Information Technology.

3.0 Implementation

3.1 Electronic and information technology services developed by or for an official unit of the university, or its auxiliary organizations, shall be designed to be compatible with and accessible through commonly used assistive technology. This includes websites developed by individual employees on University servers and used in support of university services, programs, and courses available to the campus community.

3.2 Existing websites (legacy sites) shall be brought into compliance with minimum web accessibility standards.

3.3 To the extent possible, the University shall provide course material that is accessible to all persons regardless of disability.

3.4 The University shall make every effort to assure that vendor-supplied electronic and information technology products and services comply with this accessibility policy.

3.5 The Senior Director for Information Technology/Chief Information Officer, working in conjunction with appropriate committees, shall establish and implementation plan with appropriate timelines and milestones for assuring compliance with executive orders and state and federal laws. The implementation plan shall include definitions of minimal accessibility standards and be clearly posted on the University’s website.