Scholarly Teaching Projects

Examples from CTL Mini-Grants and Learning Communities

Click on the project title for the full details about each project. All projects are listed alphabetically by faculty member below or you can find projects related to specific topics or submitted for specific CTL programs:

CTL Mini-grants: Fall 2015   |   Spring 2016   |   Fall 2016
Faculty Learning Communities: Digital Pedagogy (2014-15)

Active Learning   |   Collaborative Learning   |   Flipped Classroom   |   Instructional Technology   |   Writing   |

Thais Alves

Thais Alves

Civil Engineering

CTL Mini-grant Fall 2015

Story-telling in Engineering

Professor Thais da C.L. Alves was inspired by a children’s story telling card game to create a class activity to help her engineering students meet two outcomes from the accreditation board ABET for engineering courses: to demonstrate an ability to formulate and solve problems and to communicate effectively in writing. She rolled out this innovation in two classes, one graduate level (CONE 651, Project Production Systems Design) and one undergraduate (CONE 301, Construction Ethics, Law, and Contracts). The innovation involved distributing to teams of students playing cards she created using course concepts, terms and illustrations. The teams then each 15 minutes to compose a paragraph that applied the terms on their cards to real-life situations. When time was up, the teams read their paragraphs aloud to the class and received feedback on their use of the terms. This activity succeeded in meeting her goals to promote student engagement and to improve their writing skills and knowledge of concepts and terms through application to various other contexts.

Janet Bowers

Janet Bowers

Mathematics

CTL Mini-grant Fall 2015

Active Learning in Calculus

To bring social interaction and real-life applications of her lectures to her 700-student Math 141 course, Professor Janet Bowers added an active learning component, combining technology and discussion to engage students in exploring novel solutions to problems related to material covered in her lectures within one short time frame. Students worked in pairs to solve problems using the Learning Catalytics app, which enabled them to input solutions to problems in a variety of ways, such as drawing overlapping graphs with their fingers. These collaborative breakout sessions facilitated the Course Learning Goals for students to engage in exploration, work on questions with others, and arrive at solutions in creative ways.

Esperanza Camargo

Esperanza Camargo

Criminal Justice

CTL Mini-grant Fall 2016

Innovations to Criminal Justice 300 Course

In order to promote an individualized learning experience in her 118 student CJ 300 course, Professor Esperanza Camargo changed the class format from lecture-only to a combination of lecturing and class activities. Included in the innovations were group activities, clickers for providing feedback, audio and video components, and guest speakers. Based on student responses to a survey and on their general class performance, the new class format proved to be more effective in both engaging the students and delivering a more understandable content.

Marva Cappello

Marva Cappello

Teacher Education

CTL Mini-grant Spring 2016

HACKing Disciplinary Literacy in TE 930

In response to the School of Teacher Education community stakeholders’ call for increased technology preparation for student teachers, Professor Cappello’s TE930 Literacy Methods class for teacher credential candidates integrated HACKS, an app smashing pedagogical innovation enabling multimedia responses to readings and course content. She found that HACKing successfully replaced more traditional assignments, such as quizzes and essays, in addressing SLOs to engage linguistically and culturally diverse students through a variety of instructional strategies. HACKing worked on multiple levels, as her students were required to include technology as a tool for literacy instruction, as well as engage their own students to use technology to demonstrate learning. Success was measured by the results of the assignment rubric, along with pre- and post- surveys.

Clarissa Clò

Clarissa Clò

Italian Studies

Digital Pedagogy Faculty Learning Community 2014-15

New Business Italian Course

Director of the Italian Studies Program, Professor Clarissa Clò, developed a new course in Business Italian (Italian 496) with the goal of helping students to acquire a commercial and entrepreneurial perspective on Italian culture with a strong digital component. This research-driven and project-based course featured a mixture of independent study, internship and service-learning for multiple and concurrent projects centered around event planning, cultural and content curation, management, data analysis and social media marketing. Collaborative group projects culminated in public exhibitions and digital archives documenting their project. In addition, students created individual digital portfolios to share their application process based on actual positions in Italy, including various documents and interviews entirely in Italian.  Clò looks forward to further developing and refining this innovative course, with plans to integrate it permanently into the Italian Studies Program curriculum.

Karen Ehrhart

Karen Ehrhart

Management

CTL Mini-grant Fall 2015

Implementing Clickers

For her two sections of MGT 352, Human Resource Management, Professor Karen Ehrhart had two goals for her students: to increase their engagement in quality class discussions and to increase their learning of course material. She succeeded in meeting these goals through the use of clickers, which enabled her students to share anonymously personal experiences relevant to course content, and to test their understanding of the material through in-class “Check your knowledge” questions posed at strategic learning points. She found that not only did the clickers stimulate increased student participation in the class, but they also gave her valuable feedback regarding the students’ level of grasping course material before moving on to the next topic. The successful results of this innovation were revealed through positive student feedback and better performance on exams.

Juanjuan Fan

Juanjuan Fan

Mathematics and Statistics

CTL Mini-grant Spring 2016

Informed Survival in Stat 678: Survival Analysis

Working under the premise that student learning is improved with examples and rubrics to guide their work, Professor Juanjuan Fan posted recordings on Blackboard of her in-class software demonstrations and lectures for students to review before undertaking their final project of data analysis and report writing in her graduate level Stat 678 Survival Analysis course. In addition to the recordings, she posted exemplary published papers before taking students to work on specific aspects of their projects in the computer lab. Comparing her students’ performance in this course to a previous course using the same rubric showed improved scores in their data analysis, suggesting that students directly benefitted from this new access to exemplars and recordings.

Lisa Gates

Lisa Gates

Administration, Rehabilitation, and Postsecondary Education

CTL Mini-grant Fall 2016

Redesign of ARP 610 Educational Leadership and implementation of a Dilemma-Based Learning approach

In response to students’ requests to focus more on social justice leadership in her graduate-level course ARP 610, Educational Leadership, Professor Lisa Gates redesigned the course, hoping to achieve deeper engagement, provide a structure that would allow for increased student voices in addressing critical problems facing higher education, and synthesize the content across the semester. She implemented Dilemma-Based Learning, which situates the learner as a central problem solver. By creating a structure whereby students could revisit key concepts throughout the semester, Gates was able to address important issues more deeply rather than simply add more course content. Students worked in teams to identify a specific problem in higher education, define the extent of the problem, interview administrators and students about the problem, research and identify solutions, and present their findings at the end of the semester.

Sahar Ghanipoor Machiani

Sahar Ghanipoor Machiani

Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

CTL Mini-grant Spring 2016

“Write or Die”: Innovative Writing Tool in CIVE 781

ABET outcomes for Engineering courses demand that students demonstrate an ability to use modern tools to communicate with consistent, focused writing under time constraints. With this in mind, Professor Sahar Machiani implemented the “Write or Die” application into her CIVE 781 graduate level Seminar in Transportation Engineering course, hoping to promote student engagement and writing skills, and also to provide her with insight into course material not fully understood by the students. The application works by reinforcing both negatively and positively the students’ writing behavior in class. Within set time and word count limits, Machiani asked her students to focus on specific class topics and to write without stopping to avoid the app’s negative consequences, such as unpleasant sounds or even the loss of writing done so far. Positive consequences included pleasant music that stopped if the student stopped writing. Overall, Machiani found this innovation to be instrumental in evaluating students’ learning in the class, and in helping them to focus on the topics at hand.

Emily Hicks

Emily Hicks

Chicano/a Studies

Digital Pedagogy Faculty Learning Community 2014-15

Course-Level Intervention for Chicana/o Studies and English and Comparative Literature

ABET outcomes for Engineering courses demand that students demonstrate an ability to use modern tools to communicate with consistent, focused writing under time constraints. With this in mind, Professor Sahar Machiani implemented the “Write or Die” application into her CIVE 781 graduate level Seminar in Transportation Engineering course, hoping to promote student engagement and writing skills, and also to provide her with insight into course material not fully understood by the students. The application works by reinforcing both negatively and positively the students’ writing behavior in class. Within set time and word count limits, Machiani asked her students to focus on specific class topics and to write without stopping to avoid the app’s negative consequences, such as unpleasant sounds or even the loss of writing done so far. Positive consequences included pleasant music that stopped if the student stopped writing. Overall, Machiani found this innovation to be instrumental in evaluating students’ learning in the class, and in helping them to focus on the topics at hand.

Katie Hughes

Katie Hughes

Rhetoric and Writing Studies

CTL Mini-grant Fall 2016

Reflection and Direction Journal

To address specific pedagogical challenges associated with the online delivery of RWS 305W during a full 16-week semester, Professor Katie Hughes created a Reflection & Direction Journal assignment, to be completed for points after each live session, and structured so that students first reflect on the key points of the lecture content, and then direct their learning to a specific application to their work in progress. In addition to serving as an accountability measure for attending or watching the weekly live sessions, the journal contributed to learning goals of reinforcing lecture key points and applying concepts actively to work-in-progress.  Furthermore, the journal created an opportunity for formative feedback in both directions: from student to instructor, revealing areas of confusion with course concepts, and from instructor to student, offering suggestions and solutions to challenges at hand.

Pamela Jackson, Zoe Jarocki, Jenny Wong-Welch

Pamela Jackson, Zoe Jarocki, Jenny Wong-Welch

Library and Information Services

Digital Pedagogy Faculty Learning Community 2014-15

Instructional Resources Critical Digital Literacy Library Tutorial

In response to an increase in digital projects assigned to students, library faculty members, Zoe Jarocki, Jenny Wong-Welch, and Pamela Jackson, developed an online tutorial to provide students with information, digital and visual literacy skills. The three self-paced modules show students how to find, use, and cite images; how copyright works when using library resources and why intellectual property matters; and how to evaluate the effectiveness and reliability of visual images and media. Faculty who include digital projects in their courses can assign this tutorial to their students to ensure ethical research methods and uses of images and other digital resources.

Mary Ann Lyman-Hager

Mary Ann Lyman-Hager

European Studies

Digital Pedagogy Faculty Learning Community 2014-15

Flipping French 421

In flipping French 421, French Civilization, Professor Lyman-Hager wanted to create an interactive online experience that would enhance students’ reading comprehension and writing skills, as well as facilitate their media savvy and oral skills for in-class presentations. Using tools such as the Articulate Storyline Template, and with the assistance of colleagues François Vanveene and Lise Mercurol, Lyman-Hager converted course content to a series of bi-lingual, media-rich slides, accessible free online to students via Blackboard and archived for shared use in courses at other universities. Students reported increased confidence in their communication and presentation skills as a result of this approach, and Lyman-Hager’s teaching evaluations went way up as well.

Antoni Luque

Antoni Luque

Mathematics and Statistics

CTL Mini-grant Fall 2015

Inverting Math 342A: Learning Glass and Team-Based Learning

With goals of increasing student confidence and skills through more engagement during class time, Professor Antoni Luque implemented two pedagogical innovations to flip his Math 342A course, Methods of Applied Mathematics A, a demanding course that challenges students to acquire high-order cognitive skills in a short period of time. First, Luque used the Learning Glass for recording his lectures so students could view them before coming to class. Once in class, he students engaged in Team-Based Learning activities, his second course innovation. He ran this flipped class in a Learning Research Studio classroom, further enhancing the ability to fulfill his goal of promoting interaction and cooperative learning among students. He reinforced the recorded lecture material with in-class quizzes and team feedback, as well as application exercises and other collaborative learning activities and follow-up mini-lectures.

Arthur Santana

Arthur Santana

Journalism and Media Studies

CTL Mini-grant Spring 2016

Using iPads to Create News in JMS 550

Professor Arthur Santana implemented the use of iPads in his JMS 550 Multimedia News Laboratory course to address the cultural shift in the way news is consumed today using mobile devices. In addition to addressing course goals for students to create and manage digital news content using emergent technology, he also wanted to position the School itself at the cutting-edge of journalism education. In the lab, students learned how to use iPads for all three stages of creating news: collecting, editing and publishing. Students then applied these skills in a real-world environment, gathering news at the community level for their final projects. The result of this project was not only to help students become adept at using mobile technology to create multimedia news content, but also to give them confidence in their job marketability after graduation.

Nellie Tran

Nellie Tran

Counseling and School Psychology

CTL Mini-grant Fall 2016

Using Wikipedia as a Platform for Disseminating Research Knowledge

Professor Nellie Tran developed a teaching innovation using Wikipedia to address course learning outcomes for research methods and writing, as well as her own teaching and philosophical goals for students to engage in anti-oppressive education and research. Creating or adding to entries on Wikipedia required students to learn the important skill of reading expert knowledge and translating for a lay audience, while seeing their work as contributing to their professional reputation, image, and voice. Contributing to Wikipedia also gave students the opportunity to use research strategies to be social change agents. Tran’s Wikipedia Project succeeded in facilitating students’ growth and identification with research through increased engagement to become critical consumers of knowledge.

Chris Werry

Chris Werry

Rhetoric and Writing Studies

Digital Pedagogy Faculty Learning Community 2014-15

Mapping Digital Literacies & Piloting Critical Digital Literacy Instruction in GE Writing Courses

Rhetoric & Writing Studies Professor Chris Werry set out to discover levels of digital literacy amongst undergraduate students in order to address related pedagogical challenges by creating curriculum and providing a data base of resources for writing instructors to draw upon. First, Werry conducted research via surveys, reflections and interviews focused on assessing students’ engagement with and level of sophistication using various digital resources. Surveys also questioned students’ own interest in actually learning how better to use digital skills in school, with a majority indicating a desire for their educations to include instruction in digital tools to search, navigate, research, evaluate, bookmark and annotate. Werry then revised the Course Learning Outcomes for eight sections of RWS 100 to pilot curriculum incorporating digital literacy skills, including specifically focused modules, such as “Search Literacy.” He also created a wiki with tools and resources for instructors to use when teaching these skills, and plans to further research and build on these for wider applications in undergraduate writing programs.

Luke Winslow

Luke Winslow

Communications

CTL Mini-grant Fall 2015

Online Argument

One of Professor Luke Winslow’s learning outcomes in COMM 482, Communication & Politics, is for students to engage in productive, sustained online political discussions. To achieve this goal, Winslow directed groups of students to address controversial issues on politically motivated sites, encouraging them to analyze and employ effective rhetorical strategies in order to demonstrate communication competencies and act as citizen communicators by promoting improved public deliberation in online communities.  The project helped him to align his course learning outcomes with those of the School of Communication by introducing technological and collaborative components to his pedagogy.